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Attitude adjustment: It might seem insignificant, but for many, a simple change in hairstyle can bring about a whole new attitude, and for one area hairstylist, the ability to help provide this change is the most fulfilling aspect of the job.

Ed Luttrell, a Charles County native, is the manager of Studio M Salon in La Plata. Luttrell first began work here as a shampoo boy in various local salons, and received his training from Aaron’s Academy of Beauty in Waldorf. After he received his certification in 1989, which Luttrell said requires 1,500 hours or about nine months of time, he went on to work as a stylist for Regis Salon in St. Charles Towne Center mall.

In 1998, after working at a variety of area salons, Luttrell moved to Florida, where he stayed for five years.

“I loved Florida, but it was just too hot there for me,” Luttrell said. “I also missed the area here, and all my family is here, so I made my way back home.”

Loving loyalty: When Luttrell returned to Charles County, he said he was pleasantly surprised at the loyalty of clients past.

“I’ve got a couple clients who have been with me since my first day on the job at Regis 25 year ago,” Luttrell said. “If you’re good at what you do, people will remember you and want to come back to you.”

After Luttrell moved back to the area, he returned for a time to Wave Lengths Salon, where he had worked for a time before moving away. Following that, he became the owner of Alchemy Salon, which Luttrell said he sold a couple years back prior to moving to Classic Image in Waldorf.

“M” for marvelous: Although Luttrell has only worked at Studio M since November, he has quickly become acclimated to it.

“I love it here,” Luttrell said. “It’s a wonderful salon with a good staff, and I want to be able to take the salon and make it even better than it is right now.”

Luttrell said that for a stylist to remain successful in the industry, the most important thing is keeping educated, which he prides himself on.

“I always try to find new ways to educate myself, like a class here, a seminar there. ... It keeps us fresh and on the cutting edge,” Luttrell said. “In this industry it’s very important to be aware of new techonologies, trends and styles so you can continue to serve the client as best as possible.”

Communication challenges: Luttrell said he finds stylist-to-client communication to be the most challenging aspect of the job, but that it also ties into the most rewarding part.

“The most important thing for a client is a good consultation,” Luttrell said. “A stylist like myself, who’s been doing this for a while, can usually understand pretty well what the client is after, but it’s just a matter of making sure you understand entirely. You have to be able to question more to understand more. ... I love being able to reinvent someone’s hair. It’s amazing how people just perk up when they get some newness to their style. To meet them, greet them and give them something they love is wonderful.”

Even after all this time, Luttrell said he still loves his job just as much as he did the first day.

“I’m still in love with this industry,” Luttrell said. “I’ve always wanted to do this, and it’s so rewarding to meet new people every day.”

Lindsay RennerGot an idea for someone to profile in On the job? Send your suggestions to Angela Breck at abreck@somdnews.com or 7 Industrial Park Drive, Waldorf, MD 20602. Call 301-764-2847.