ADVERTISEMENT


ADVERTISEMENT


ADVERTISEMENT


FEATURED JOBS




Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Delicious
E-mail this article
Print this Article
advertisement

Federal prosecutors report that a retired Navy employee who worked for 42 years at a St. Inigoes facility pleaded guilty on Tuesday to unlawfully disclosing procurement contractor bid and source selection information, to give the former contract holder a competitive advantage.

Gregory Roger Penk, 64, faces a possible maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Maryland, at a court hearing in June.

Penk’s plea agreement states that from 1969 until last July, he worked for the Navy in St. Inigoes, and in 2001 became a division director for an identification systems division. In June 2010, the plea agreement states, the Navy solicited bids for a new Naval Air Warfare Center-Aircraft Division contract for services that previously had been provided by Booz Allen Hamilton, which was one of the companies submitting bids on the new contract.

Penk was responsible for assisting the Navy facility’s contracting officer with funding, performance and technical issues related to the program, and the plea agreement states that on three separate occasions in early 2011 Penk disclosed contractor bid and source selection information about the contract to the Booz Allen Hamilton.

Penk called one of the company’s employees three times and provided specific information about the contract, including the fact that the firm might not win the project and that its bid was $7.5 million higher than a competitor’s bid, according to Penk’s plea agreement. Penk also informed the employee that the Navy would be issuing a best and final offer request, and that the firm should prepare for that request.

Penk’s plea agreement and a release by the federal prosecutor’s office did not indicate any wrongdoing by Booz Allen Hamilton or any of its employees.

The Navy learned about Penk’s illegal disclosures and had to rebid the contract, the prosecutors’ office reports, and the federal government will ask a judge to require Penk to pay restitution of $24,108.

jwharton@somdnews.com