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U.S. House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer swept Maryland House Minority Leader Anthony J. O’Donnell in Tuesday’s election, winning majorities in each of the 5th Congressional District’s jurisdictions en route to his 17th congressional term.

With a majority of precincts reporting, Hoyer (D-Md., 5th) had received 69 percent of the overall vote and an overwhelming 85-percent show of support in Prince George’s County.

“I have been proud to represent the 5th District in Congress and am honored to have been re-elected by voters to continue serving our community,” Hoyer said in a statement late Tuesday night. “Throughout my career, I have worked on a bipartisan basis in the 5th District and in Washington to deliver results for my constituents protecting and preserving jobs, strengthening our local economy and making important investments in our future. I’m proud of this work and will continue to build on this record so we can put more Marylanders back to work, help businesses grow and expand, and strengthen the middle class.”

Nearly half of the 5th Congressional District’s voters live in Prince George’s, where Democrats outnumber Republicans 6 to 1.

Hoyer also easily won Charles County, where Democrats enjoy more than a 2-to-1 advantage over Republicans in voter registration, with 69 percent of the vote. O’Donnell claimed 28 percent of the vote in Charles.

The margins were much closer in Calvert and St. Mary’s counties but still bitter for O’Donnell (R-Calvert, St. Mary’s), who lost both of the jurisdictions he represents in the statehouse two years after they went in favor of then-Republican challenger Charles Lollar.

Hoyer won Calvert with 49 percent of the vote and St. Mary’s with 53 percent. O’Donnell claimed 48 and 45 percent of the vote in Calvert and St. Mary’s, respectively.

Libertarian Arvin Vohra and Green Party candidate Bob Auerbach finished a distant third and fourth, each claiming little more than 1 percent of the vote.

jnewman@somdnews.com