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Two gamers at the Calvert Library Prince Frederick took on gamers from 22 libraries Saturday in the International Smash Bros. Brawl Finals.

Calvin Gorman, 11, and Mitchell Mudd, 23, battled through 10 qualifying rounds and one finals round before being eliminated by Ann Arbor District Library in Michigan, who hosted the tournament.

“Once we got to the finals, we ended up getting stomped,” Calvin said Monday, adding that “the other guys were really good.”

Other tournament participants consisted of libraries from Vermont, Texas, Missouri, Minnesota, California, Ohio, New York and North Carolina, among many others across the nation, and even a library in Madrid, Spain.

On Oct. 27, the library hosted the prequalifying, double-elimination tournament to determine who was going to play in the International Smash Bros. Brawl Finals.

During the prequalifying rounds, Calvin said he only lost once and it was to Mudd, who placed first for the finals followed by Calvin in second.

Calvin said most of the players at the prequalifiers were teenagers and easier to beat than the “way more skilled and brute” players from the last Mario tournament the library hosted in March.

“It was a little awkward going in [for the prequalifiers] ‘cause there was no age limit,” explained Mudd. “I was easily the oldest one there by like five years,” he said.

But the age didn’t matter Saturday.

“I thought of him as just my teammate,” Mudd said, noting that if Calvin was good enough to get to that point, that’s all that mattered.

Calvin said he began playing games from the Mario franchise a few years ago, beginning with Mario Smash Bros. Brawl when he got his Wii gaming system in 2009.

He said it was “on a random day” when he was sitting at the table and noticed a box on the counter.

“I was like, ‘Am I mistaken, or is that a Wii?’” Calvin explained, adding that he was making sure it wasn’t one of his Dad’s computers.

Calvin said he and his two younger brothers, Marcus and Nathan, borrowed Smash Bros. Brawl from the library at first before purchasing it.

“I think we borrowed it twice actually,” Calvin said.

Mudd, on the other hand, had been playing Mario Smash Bros. on previous gaming systems.

He said he had played this particular Smash Bros. when it first came out, but not too much over the last year or so.

“It’s kind of like riding a bike,” Mudd said of playing the game.

aharrison@somdnews.com