Montgomery schools’ ‘Seven Keys’ to change -- Gazette.Net


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The benchmarks that dictate student success in Montgomery County will soon be changing.

The Montgomery County Board of Education talked with school system employees at its board meeting Tuesday about student progress on the “Seven Keys of College and Career Readiness” and how the keys will change in the next few years.

The keys, developed in 2008, provide goals for students as they advance in grade level, such as advanced reading in kindergarten through second grade, Algebra II by grade 11 and, finally, a 1650 on the SAT or a 24 on the ACT.

Susan F. Marks, acting associate superintendent of the school system’s Office of Shared Accountability, explained to board members Tuesday that while the school system has made progress on the keys, achievement gaps still exist among racial groups.

Changes to the keys this year would reflect the changes in education and testing nationwide, schools spokesman Dana Tofig said.

The changes would also reflect adjustments being made this year to the school system’s strategic plan. Accountability measures are changing in accordance with the new Curriculum 2.0 and the Common Core State Standards, a new nationwide educational model.

The first three keys are “in transition,” and other goals could be added or changed, according to a Dec. 11 memo from Superintendent Joshua P. Starr to the school board.

The first three keys provide goals based on:

— TerraNova, an elementary reading test, which is no longer used;

— The Maryland State Assessments, which will soon be replaced by Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers assessments, or PARCC assessments, and;

— The current mathematics pathway, which will change under Curriculum 2.0.

When the keys were originally developed, they were based on research about students who were on a trajectory to college, Tofig said. New surveys and data could be used to change or add goals, the memo states.

jbondeson@gazette.net