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Somebody once said that every generation gets its turn in the White House. Through their kaleidoscope drug-induced visions, they protested war, the industrial-complex, big business and “The Man.”

Their loopy dreams of communal living, growing their own food, collecting rain water, depending on solar and wind power only, divisions of labor, singalongs and bongs are all now mainstream realities. Dropping out and learning the guitar are now all possible with passage of communal health care, shutting down fossil fuel use 300 years prematurely with no viable replacement in sight.

The hippies of the 1960s and ’70s are now in charge. Back then, they were fractured and haphazard in their protests. Students for a Democratic Society, Symbionese Liberation Army, Black Panthers, Jane Fonda, The Chicago Seven have all matured politically and are supremely well-funded and focused and determined as ever to break the profit-loss, free enterprise system once and for all.

Now working from within, they collapse the U.S. dollar with the 24/7 printing of money. In the ensuing rush for limited resources, priorities will have to be set and administered by the new order with half the population not paying taxes or receiving their needs in the mail. The tipping point has been reached. Only the well-to-do stand in the way.

As their net worth is diminished by debt and higher taxes, they will gradually be neutered. The visions of freedom and pursuit of happiness that our forefathers longed for, the American love of individual freedom the Greatest Generation stormed Normandy for, will all be for naught.

Four years ago, the Simpson-Bowles plan called for 20 years of austerity to pay back $6 trillion. Congress is now about to raise that number to $21 trillion.

What does the new order in charge know that we don’t? What amount keeps them awake at night? Six trillion dollars didn’t; $21 trillion doesn’t. They are so certain of their capabilities to allocate and redistribute. The Woodstock economy is upon us. What is really scary is they are our neighbors, friends and relatives.

We have met the enemy, and he is us.



Thomas A. Carr, Bryantown