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Over the last couple of years, I have watched the Charles County elementary and middle schools system go through a painful redistricting transition.

In 2013, the high school redistricting proposal will be revealed to the community. I’m sure this will be painful for many of the students and parents. This will affect my family, also.

My son attended Theodore G. Davis Middle School in the sixth and seventh grades. Because of redistricting, he now attends Matthew Henson Middle School for eighth grade. He’s currently is scheduled to attend his neighborhood school, North Point, for his ninth-grade year.

All the redistricting proposals are supposed to take effect in 2014.

This could possibly mean that my son will attend another high school for this sophomore year. That’s four schools (Davis, Henson, North Point and possibly McDonough) in four years.

Most citizens understand that redistricting is necessary to ease the overcrowding issue in many of our schools.

This was caused by former Charles County commissioners who approved DRRA applications at a feverish pace.

What most citizens can’t understand is that if the current county commissioners see the overcrowding problems, why are they still approving DRRA applications?

It’s apparent from the Feb. 15 letter to the editor [“Allowing the overcrowding of our schools,” Maryland Independent] that the Charles County Board of Education doesn’t understand either.

If the Charles County citizens and board of education members don’t understand, this leads me to assume the commissioners are not representing the citizens who voted them into office.

It’s time for the citizens to speak up by voting their approval or disapproval in the next local election.

It’s my hope that the Maryland Independent will show the DRRA voting record of each commissioner over the last three to four years so the citizens can be well informed as they enter the voting booth.



Leonard Randolph Jr., Waldorf