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Maryland Conservation Corps members practice forestry, one of the many tasks in which AmeriCorps program participants engage.

If you’ve envisioned a career spent in the outdoors, where you can also help to give back, then AmeriCorps may have the job for you.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is currently recruiting members for the Maryland Conservation Corps, an AmeriCorps program, staff writer Michael Allshouse recently reported. The program looks to involve young adults, ages 17 to 25, in conversation, environmental and natural resources management projects across the state.

“What we are looking for in applicants is people who are enthusiastic, who have a conservation mindset, people who want to make a difference,” Ranger Luke Terrell of Maryland Park Services said. “We take people without a lot of skills, and we teach them the skills that they need to do natural resource-based work.”

The department is currently looking to fill 35 full-time positions. Those positions will be part of seven teams that will work for 11 months, beginning in late September.

“It is a pretty wide range of jobs and responsibilities,” Terrell said. “Anywhere from animal care to chain saw work to trail work to the environmental education programs. We work with forestry, fishery. We do things like trout stocking. We do prescribed burns to help prevent wildfires. Depending on the crew and depending on the day, every day can look a little bit different. Our members definitely have to be flexible. I might get a text at 7 p.m. the night before saying that the plans have changed and we need to go help disaster relief in a park.”

While the tasks of the job may sound a bit overwhelming, Terrell is quick to reiterate these are entry-level positions that can grow as the applicant grows.

“I will say that a lot of the members that we do get that end up being the most successful don’t really have any idea of what they want to do,” Terrell said. AmeriCorps “is a great way to figure out if they are interested in conservation work or what type of conservation work they may be into. We have people go off and be foresters, some to the department of agriculture. Our employees run the gamut. We have members that go for a year and say this isn’t for me, but I’m glad I did it, and then they go on to something unrelated. And that is pretty neat, too.”

To be considered, interested individuals must submit an online application available at http://dnr.maryland.gov/publiclands/Pages/mcc_application.aspx. Placement will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

Kepferle scholarship goes to Chopticon grad

Mackenzie Windsor, a recent graduate of Chopticon High School, was selected to receive this year’s $2,500 college scholarship established in memory of 1999 Great Mills High School graduate, Patrick Kepferle. Windsor will be attending the University of Delaware this fall to pursue a major in music.

The memorial scholarship was established after 18-year-old Kepferle died from vaccine-preventable meningococcal meningitis on March 5, 2000, while a freshman at Towson University. The trustees award the scholarship to college-bound applicants from St. Mary’s County who are selected as best representing Kepferle’s selfless nature and his determination to overcome obstacles.

The annual award is made possible through the contributions of individual donors in the local area and across the country. Additional information about meningitis prevention and recommended vaccines can be found at the National Association of School Nurses website at www.voicesofmeningitis.org.

Sotterley to host slave remembrance program

As a UNESCO Slave Route Site of Remembrance, Historic Sotterley invites the public to the museum site in Hollywood on Friday, Aug. 23, to honor the memories of those that perished or survived the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The museum will remember the abolition of the trade and celebrate the contributions of survivors whose strength built nations, according to a release from Sotterley. This program is made possible in part by a generous grant from Maryland Humanities.

At 11 a.m., join community members and leaders in a ceremony that will include a reading of the names of known enslaved at Sotterley, and to pour libations and/or honor the ancestors in your own way at Historic Sotterley’s original slave cabin. Then at 1 p.m. hear and discuss how the slave trade and its abolition has affected and continues to affect us all, followed by a bell ringing at 2:30 p.m. commemorating the 29 people known to have perished on the Middle Passage to this site.

Check in at the visitors center for this program with free admission. Guided tours will be limited; check www.sotterley.org.

Motorcycle safety stressed by state

The Maryland Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Administration Highway Safety Office and Maryland State Police earlier this summer publicized a reminder to motorcycle riders of two programs designed to help reduce crashes and fatalities and help Maryland’s 283,000 registered motorcyclists stay safe on the road.

BikeSafe Maryland provides motorcycle riders with free skills assessments and valuable feedback from officers with the Maryland State Police Motorcycle Unit, Maryland Transportation Authority Police and local police departments. Riders learn techniques promoting motorcycle control, collision avoidance and overall safety. The program is open to all motorcyclists with a valid motorcycle license or learner’s permit. Visit bikesafemd.com to enroll.

Another program sponsored by the highway safety office promotes sober riding by placing PODS storage units at restaurants where motorcyclists can store their bikes for free if they have too much to drink. One unit is located at Big Falls Inn in White Marsh and the other is at Full Moon Pub and Grill in Reisterstown, and will be at those spots through October. The state has funding for up to five more PODS and is seeking additional locations. To host a container, contact Motorcycle Safety Program Manager Ernie Lehr at elehr@mdot.maryland.gov.

Student public service awardees announced

Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) recently announced the Southern Maryland recipients of his 2019 Public Service Award, which is designed to commend high school seniors who demonstrate a high level of commitment to community or public service. Van Hollen announced more than 125 recipients throughout Maryland.

Local recipients of the public service award are Amyah Hill of Chopticon High, Alyssa Dorsey of the Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center, Laik A. Meadows of Leonardtown High, Hailey Lagimoniere of Huntingtown High School, Rachel Evans of Patuxent High, Bailey Krick of Northern High, Isaiah Willett of Calvert High, Donovan Inscoe of Thomas Stone High and Samuel Guzzone of Henry E. Lackey High.

The Van Hollen Public Service Award is awarded to students who display a deep sense of dedication to public service, take meaningful personal initiative and bring an innovative and fresh approach to improving the lives of others. The senator’s office invited local schools to nominate students who embody these guidelines.

Black bear hunting lottery open in state

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is now accepting applications for the 2019 black bear hunt lottery. Successful applicants will receive a permit valid for the five-day hunting season, taking place Oct. 21 to 25 in Allegany, Frederick, Garrett and Washington counties. The department will issue 800 hunting permits this year.

The annual bear hunt is an important management tool used to slow the increase of Maryland’s black bear population and limit expansion of Maryland bears into the eastern suburbs and cities, according to DNR.

Hunters may apply for the lottery online, at regional service centers, or at one of more than 250 hunting and fishing license agents across the state. All entries must be completed by Aug. 31 and must be accompanied by a $15 nonrefundable application fee. Only one application per person will be accepted. The drawing will be held Sept. 3.

Church to host women’s conference on Aug. 24

The Women’s Ministry of First Missionary Baptist Church in Lexington Park will host the 2019 Women’s Conference Saturday, Aug. 24, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A continental breakfast will be served at 8 a.m.

This year’s theme is “God’s People Fulfilling God’s Purpose.” The conference facilitator will be minister Renee Minor-Johnson of Metro Life Church in Louisiana. Other conference leaders include psalmist Sister Shelia Minor of New Morning Star Missionary Baptist Church in Louisiana, and conference preacher Evangelist Jacqueline K. Waller of Norris Avenue Missionary Baptist Church in Memphis. And on Sunday, Aug. 25, Evangelist Ayanna Foster-Kelson of Dominion Apostolic Ministries in Lexington Park will be the church’s guest preacher. Registration fee is $25. Call 301-863-8388 to learn more.Past editions of The Tester available digitally

Archives from 1948 to 1962 of The Tester newspaper, which is owned by APG Media, the parent company of The Enterprise, are now available digitally through the St. Mary’s County Library on its website at http://stmalib.archivalweb.com/reelSelector.php. The library system and Naval Air Station Patuxent River also have made available the list of command histories at the base from the 1940s and 1950s.

The Navy plans to continue the digitization process to include other editions of the paper, including early dates starting in 1943 as well as later issues post-1962. Some editions not currently available online via the library’s website are available to view at the three public library branches. Anyone with access to any pre-1948 editions of The Tester is asked to contact Patrick Gordon at Pax River at 301-757-3343 or email patrick.a.gordon@navy.mil.

Rent Cove Point Lighthouse

The Cove Point Lighthouse in Calvert County can be rented for three, four or seven nights. The entire lighthouse accommodate up to 16 people; or just one side of the duplex can be rented for up to eight people.

Since this mixed-use lighthouse property on the Chesapeake Bay is still a fully functioning site, in addition to being a vacation rental, it continues to welcome the public for tours of the grounds from 1 to 4 p.m. on weekends and holidays, May through September, and daily June, July and August.

The lightkeeper’s house was originally built in 1828, but enlarged in 1925 to make it a duplex for two keepers and their families. Four acres of the grounds are fenced with a private entrance and direct access to the beach.

For more information and to book a stay, visit www.calvertmarinemuseum.com/218/Cove-Point-Lighthouse-Rental, call 410-326-2042, ext. 17, or email purdyma@co.cal.md.us.

Twitter: @JesseEntNews