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This past Saturday, as they do each year, the Calvert County Commission for Women and League of Women Voters of Calvert County celebrated local women, and a woman of tomorrow, at the annual Women of the World awards luncheon. It’s one day a year when residents, civic and nonprofit leaders, d…

Earlier this session, the Maryland Senate and House of Delegates passed legislation to extend the current moratorium on cownose ray killing contests in the Chesapeake Bay for two more years until a fishery management plan is created for the species by the Maryland Department of Natural Resou…

Public records laws aren’t about the press. These statutes are in place to help everyday people engage and affect the governmental bodies that make decisions and policies on their behalf. During Sunshine Week, an annual nationwide celebration of access to public information, it’s especially …

With the next census just around the corner and controversy afoot at the national level — the Trump administration wants to add a citizenship question to the questionnaire that some say would deter immigrants from participating, an effort that is currently blocked awaiting a ruling by the U.…

Seven states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical aid in dying. Maryland is not on that list. But a set of bills backed by legislators on both sides of the aisle would change that.

David Allan Coe’s hit “You Never Even Called Me by My Name,” penned tongue in cheek by Steve Goodman and John Prine in the mid-1970s, was facetiously called by the artists “the perfect country song.”

Maryland legislators have been busy this year working on a host of legislation that has caught our attention, or that of our readers, whether it’s the hot potato of school scheduling — legislators are looking to override the governor’s executive order of 2016 that moved the start date to aft…

Last week, we reported a months-long Calvert County Sheriff’s Office investigation led to the arrest of an Owings man believed to be the area’s alleged “main distributor” of drugs like heroin, fentanyl, cocaine and Suboxone. In a second case, police allegedly found more than 400 grams of coc…

National Burn Awareness Week fell earlier this month. And according to our Office of the State Fire Marshal, almost one-quarter of all burn injuries occur in children under the age of 15. These burns aren’t just from fire; chemicals, hot liquids and heated devices, such as clothing irons, ha…

February often brings some celebratory warmth to the winter season. Most Americans know it as African-American History Month and the month of Valentine’s Day, and both, for their own reasons, can make our hearts and souls feel deeply.

As the temporary solution to the ultimate throw-up-their-hands moment — the shutdown of the federal government for 35 days, the longest in U.S. history — nears an end this week, the folks on Capitol Hill would do well to look to Annapolis for how to get things done.

We’re now one week into Black History Month, an observance period when we typically set aside time to remember and honor the important people and events that have helped shape the history and progress of African-Americans in this country.

These are unusual times in American journalism. Last June, five staff members of the Capital Gazette in Annapolis were killed by a lone gunman who had a long-standing beef with the paper. Then in August, the press was called “the enemy of the people” again by no less than the current occupan…

Last month, we reported on alleged racially charged threats made by athletes on two different sports teams at The Calverton School. The exchange happened on social media, and after three students were reportedly suspended, leading to pushback from parents and a coach, Head of School Christop…

After years of construction, and months of planning prior to that, the new Northern High School opened to students this month in Owings. And that $70 million project is already more than worth it.

Anyone grading the Chesapeake these days is certainly doing so on a curve. And as it turns out, the rainiest year on record in Maryland didn’t do the bay any favors.

The Maryland General Assembly went to work for another 90-day session last Wednesday, and with no real hot-button issues on the agenda this year, lawmakers set their sights on health care, taxes and other priorities they plan to tackle through legislation in 2019. After attending a local cha…